Ubuntu HowTo: Issoe with multiple monitors of which one is portrait

Original Source Link

After upgrading to Ubuntu 20.04 today i found that my monitor configuration is not working properly anymore. I have 4k primary display in landscape and a 1080p secondary display in portrait (right) mode next to it on the right. I have an ATO GTX 950 videocard to power them both.

After upgrading from 19.10 to 20.04 I fond that panel (that I use on top using ‘dash to panel’ extension was partially on second monitor. Also windows are weirldy dispayed in partially accross both screen some circumstances. After more investigation i found that when i go to second screen and move mouse cursor to right there seems to be more desktop there and the whole desktop shifts. Itś almost like the desktop is too wide for the screens.

If i change second monitor to “normal” landscape orientation the panel shifts back fully to my primary monitor (in stead of being partially on primary and partially on secondary) and all works normal (except that i cant use portait mode which i want to do and always could do before. When i “move” second monitor to left or above seconday primary monitor in display settings everyhting also looks and behaves normal (also in portrait) only the my mouse movements become illogical (i have to move cursor left off primary screen to get to monitor on the right.

Anybody have a clue what to do about this (except for possible bugfix in Ubuntu or display driver)?

I can’t enable portrait mode at all for any of my monitors in the display settings. (arandr kind of works, but limits me to 60 Hz.)

However, turns out I can do it in the Nvidia Control Panel or with xrandr. Maybe, as a workaround, you could put something like this in a startup script:

xrandr --output DP-0 --rotate left

You would have to replace DP-0 with whatever output your secondary monitor is connected to, of course.

Specs for reference:

  • OS: Ubuntu 20.04 Beta
  • GPU: RTX 2060 Super
  • Driver: Nvidia 440.64
  • Monitor 1: Acer XV273K
  • Monitor 2: Asus PG278Q

I was able to work around this by using sudo apt install arandr

running arandr in terminal and then changing the monitor orientation there.

I post a solution in the other thread: https://askubuntu.com/a/1247763/206776, repost here:

First, we create a ~/.config/monitors.xml file for the layout (we can experiment a layout with xrandr). My monitors.xml is attached below.

Then, copy the monitors.xml to /var/lib/gdm3/.config/ and change file owner:

sudo cp ~/.config/monitors.xml /var/lib/gdm3/.config/
sudo chown gdm:gdm /var/lib/gdm3/.config/monitors.xml

The monitor layout will persist across restarts and screen locks.

I had a similar problem with 20.04 LTS and seems like i solved it… I have a horizontal 4k monitor in the middle with 2 vertical 1080p monitors on the sides, with a GTX 2080 Ti. The desktop area was somehow larger than each screen, so it would scroll when my mouse went to the edge. I went to NVIDIA X Server Settings where you can actually see the desktop area versus screen size. I then clicked on each screen and moved the Underscan bar back and forth which made the extra desktop area disappear. Now everything looks normal… let’s hope it lasts a reboot.

Tagged : / / / /

Ubuntu HowTo: Can’t rotate monitor on 20.04

Original Source Link

I’ve been an ubuntu user for a few years now, and this may be my first problem ever (or at least the first I couldn’t figure out quickly by myself).

I have a 3 monitor setup with monitor ‘2’ on the left rotated 90 degrees, and monitors 1 and 3 in landscape mode.

Video card is a GTX 1060 6GB and I’m running nvidia-driver-440 (I also tested this with 390)

I updated to 20.04 today from 19.10 – all went smoothly, except monitor 2 will not rotate. If I try and rotate it, the screen refreshes, and it shows up overlapping my other monitors.

Will try the Nouveau drivers as well, but open to other ideas.

I did a fresh install yesterday and got the same issue. I was able to reconfigure the mess via the Nvidia configurator but it only last for the current session (i.e. I have to redo it all over again each time I reboot).

Here a workaround :

First create a bash script, assuming your 3 monitors are in 1920×1080 mode (if not, you will have to adjust the “–pos” offset accordingly) and the primary is the middle one :

#!/bin/bash
xrandr --output [Your monitor "2" ID] --pos 0x0 --rotate left --mode 1920x1080 
xrandr --output [Your monitor "1" ID] --primary --pos 1080x360 --mode 1920x1080 
xrandr --output [Your monitor "3" ID] --pos 3000x360 --mode 1920x1080 

(the 360 y-offset put your monitor 1 and 3 roughly at the middle of the left one, adjust it as you please)

Then make it executable and add it in your startup app list. At this point, when you boot, the script may kick in before the GUI is ready (so it does nothing). Open ~/.config/autostart/[your_script_entry_name].desktop in an editor and add the line

X-GNOME-Autostart-Delay=1

(For some reason, putting a “sleep” command in the bash script does not work, but the startup delay does…)
That did the trick for me, I hope it helps

After pondering a little longer, I tried rotating the screen via the shell with xrandr (xrandr --output DVD-I-1 --rotate right), and I’m up and running.

Weird bug, but hopefully the changes stick

I have a solution inspired by this comment#25 in the mutter bug.

First, we create a ~/.config/monitors.xml file for the layout (we can experiment a layout with xrandr). My monitors.xml is attached below.

Then, copy the monitors.xml to /var/lib/gdm3/.config/ and change file owner:

sudo cp ~/.config/monitors.xml /var/lib/gdm3/.config/
sudo chown gdm:gdm /var/lib/gdm3/.config/monitors.xml

The monitor layout will persist across restarts and screen locks.

<monitors version="2">
  <configuration>
    <logicalmonitor>
      <x>1440</x>
      <y>0</y>
      <scale>1</scale>
      <primary>yes</primary>
      <monitor>
        <monitorspec>
          <connector>HDMI-0</connector>
        </monitorspec>
        <mode>
          <width>3840</width>
          <height>1600</height>
          <rate>59.993923187255859</rate>
        </mode>
      </monitor>
    </logicalmonitor>
    <logicalmonitor>
      <x>0</x>
      <y>0</y>
      <scale>1</scale>
      <transform>
        <rotation>left</rotation>
        <flipped>no</flipped>
      </transform>
      <monitor>
        <monitorspec>
          <connector>HDMI-1</connector>
        </monitorspec>
        <mode>
          <width>2560</width>
          <height>1440</height>
          <rate>59.950550079345703</rate>
        </mode>
      </monitor>
    </logicalmonitor>
  </configuration>
</monitors>

Tagged : /

Making Game: I am using a monitor to my notebook, but have problems [closed]

Original Source Link

I am using a monitor to my notebook, but have problems, when I am using a extern monitor for my notebook the OS is often slow, why?

One way to know what is slowing down a computer is monitoring usage in Task manager.
Right click the taskbar and click on task manager, Go to performance tap and check if anything is near 100% when your computer is slow.

My guess is your graphics card is not good enough to run two monitors or the resolution of it, But that shouldn’t slow down your PC only your graphics applications.

Tagged : / /

Linux HowTo: I am using a monitor to my notebook, but have problems [closed]

Original Source Link

I am using a monitor to my notebook, but have problems, when I am using a extern monitor for my notebook the OS is often slow, why?

One way to know what is slowing down a computer is monitoring usage in Task manager.
Right click the taskbar and click on task manager, Go to performance tap and check if anything is near 100% when your computer is slow.

My guess is your graphics card is not good enough to run two monitors or the resolution of it, But that shouldn’t slow down your PC only your graphics applications.

Tagged : / /

Making Game: Simulate higher screen resolution because I want to ZOOM IN later using screen capture software (like Camtasia)

Original Source Link

I’m recording tutorials for audio software and I always find myself zooming in on details when editing the screen captures.
As a result, the zooming-ini parts have a bad resolution and look blurred.

The max screen resolution for my monitor is 1920×1080 and I’m using a GeForce GTX 750 TI graphic card.

Is there a way to record at a simulated higher 2K screen resolution?
My goal is to achieve better quality/resolution when zoooming in 180% when using the screen capture software.

Is the only way to record at a higher resolution to buy a 2K monitor?

Help is very much appreciated.

1920×1080 should be enough to suffice zooming in without a loss of quality. You need to try using other screen capture softwares like Fraps or OBS Studio because the one you’re using right now is failing to capture everything with minimal blurriness while zooming in.

You mention simulated 2K screen resolution but this simply isn’t possible because of the restraints of your monitor. It’s almost hinting at AI upscaling.. which, alas, isn’t in the mainstream yet 😛

Your resolution, as-is, is absolutely fine. There is no need to spend a lot of money on a 2K monitor. Try using other programs like I mentioned. OBS is free.

Tagged : / / / /

Linux HowTo: Simulate higher screen resolution because I want to ZOOM IN later using screen capture software (like Camtasia)

Original Source Link

I’m recording tutorials for audio software and I always find myself zooming in on details when editing the screen captures.
As a result, the zooming-ini parts have a bad resolution and look blurred.

The max screen resolution for my monitor is 1920×1080 and I’m using a GeForce GTX 750 TI graphic card.

Is there a way to record at a simulated higher 2K screen resolution?
My goal is to achieve better quality/resolution when zoooming in 180% when using the screen capture software.

Is the only way to record at a higher resolution to buy a 2K monitor?

Help is very much appreciated.

1920×1080 should be enough to suffice zooming in without a loss of quality. You need to try using other screen capture softwares like Fraps or OBS Studio because the one you’re using right now is failing to capture everything with minimal blurriness while zooming in.

You mention simulated 2K screen resolution but this simply isn’t possible because of the restraints of your monitor. It’s almost hinting at AI upscaling.. which, alas, isn’t in the mainstream yet 😛

Your resolution, as-is, is absolutely fine. There is no need to spend a lot of money on a 2K monitor. Try using other programs like I mentioned. OBS is free.

Tagged : / / / /

Ubuntu HowTo: Laptop screen blank after suspend, though external monitors working

Original Source Link

Laptop screen remained blank after resumed from suspend, though external monitors were working.

Could not do anything about it because ‘Displays’ dialogue opened on the primary screen, which was the laptop screen. Don’t want to simply reboot, because can’t easily check what needs saving, and indeed may not be able to save if can’t see primary screen.

So how get the laptop screen back to life?

This was, by the way, after I had entered the user password. It wasn’t one of those common occasions where the screens are blank when you are trying to enter the password.

  1. open a terminal, and use xrandr command to get identity of displays:

    $ xrandr

    Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 2304 x 2048
    LVDS-1 connected primary 1366×768+417+1280 …
    VGA-1 connected 1280×1024+1024+256 …
    HDMI-1 connected 1024×1280+0+0 left …

  2. tell xrandr to revive laptop screen

    $ xrandr –output “LVDS-1” –auto

By the way, often laptop screen and external monitors are all blank on resume from suspend, when the system requires a password. It seems that nothing will revive the screen. It is possible to enter the password blindly, and the screens will come on. But you might be able to revive the screens so you can see what you are doing when entering the password, by pressing the “Fn” key.

Tagged : / / / /

Making Game: Why does one of my monitors turns off (sleep) when I switch to fullscreen on Flash (Youtube,…)?

Original Source Link

I just got a new monitor (kept the old one as extended desktop).

Whenever I switch to (or from) fullscreen mode on a youtube video on the new monitor (which is the main one), it turns off for 2-3 seconds, even the backlight. Kinda like when you change resolution. If I move the same window to the other monitor and try there, I don’t have this problem.
It’s not specific to Youtube, I have the same problem on Dailymotion for example, but not Twitch for some reason.

If I turn off Hardware Acceleration in flash settings the problem goes away but I’m not sure that’s a good idea (any downside to having it off?)…

Using Windows 7 professional 64bits, Chrome 28.0.1500.95 m and Flash version 11,8,800,94. Tried with IE9 and the problem is there too. The monitor with the problem is an Asus VG23AH.

Edit: The screen also turns off for a second if I try to skip forward to a unbuffered part of the video while in fullscreen…

In the Nvidia Control Panel, “Adjust desktop color settings” tab, there’s a “Content type reported to the display” option.

It was on autoselect, and if I leave it like that it switch from (not sure I have the right translation from there, I have it in french) “Desktop programs” to “Fullscreen videos” when I switch to fullscreen on youtube, which make the screen turn off for a second. Setting it manually fix the problem.

Only thing I don’t know is which option to choose. I set it to Fullscreen videos for now. Anyone have a recommandation?

For anyone else having this issue, because I think the settings page changed and I can’t find this option myself. Turn on g-sync, then turn it off. That fixed it for me.

Tagged : / / /

Linux HowTo: Why does one of my monitors turns off (sleep) when I switch to fullscreen on Flash (Youtube,…)?

Original Source Link

I just got a new monitor (kept the old one as extended desktop).

Whenever I switch to (or from) fullscreen mode on a youtube video on the new monitor (which is the main one), it turns off for 2-3 seconds, even the backlight. Kinda like when you change resolution. If I move the same window to the other monitor and try there, I don’t have this problem.
It’s not specific to Youtube, I have the same problem on Dailymotion for example, but not Twitch for some reason.

If I turn off Hardware Acceleration in flash settings the problem goes away but I’m not sure that’s a good idea (any downside to having it off?)…

Using Windows 7 professional 64bits, Chrome 28.0.1500.95 m and Flash version 11,8,800,94. Tried with IE9 and the problem is there too. The monitor with the problem is an Asus VG23AH.

Edit: The screen also turns off for a second if I try to skip forward to a unbuffered part of the video while in fullscreen…

In the Nvidia Control Panel, “Adjust desktop color settings” tab, there’s a “Content type reported to the display” option.

It was on autoselect, and if I leave it like that it switch from (not sure I have the right translation from there, I have it in french) “Desktop programs” to “Fullscreen videos” when I switch to fullscreen on youtube, which make the screen turn off for a second. Setting it manually fix the problem.

Only thing I don’t know is which option to choose. I set it to Fullscreen videos for now. Anyone have a recommandation?

For anyone else having this issue, because I think the settings page changed and I can’t find this option myself. Turn on g-sync, then turn it off. That fixed it for me.

Tagged : / / /

Ubuntu HowTo: Zoom window is too small on Ubuntu 20.04 with a 4K screen resolution and 200% scaling

Original Source Link

I’m running Ubuntu 20.04 on a 4K screen with 200% scaling, and when I run Zoom, the menus and texts are simply too small. All other applications are scaling as expected.

I’ve attached an print screen with Zoom open, and with the terminal output.

Does anyone knows how to work around this while retaining the 4K res?

Terminal output when running zoom

Tagged : / /